5 things you need to know about the Via Francigena

Patrick

New Member
Your post was a real treat! Thank you for taking the time, in particular, explaining how the VF differs from the CS. I chose to walk the northern camino to the primotivo expressly for the beauty and the solitude. I will only have time to journey from Lucca to Rome, but it sounds like the empty spaces will be similar. I am grateful for your post!!!
 

caminka

Member
Check out my blog on 5 Things you need to know about the Via Francigena.
It covers interesting thoughts on the differences between the Camino de Santiago and the Via Francigena, Camping, Accommodation recommendations and more.

We walked the entire pilgrimage in 2018/19 and are really happy to share our thoughts.

Checkout our other pilgrimages at www.theglobalhobos.com
I didn't know about the atm thing with the banks and post offices, otherwise I pretty much agree with everything you write about italy (I've had only two days in switzerland, so other then saying it was an amazing and beautiful climb and it's expensive I can't really comment).

I was pleased to see that many of your fav sleeping places in italy have also been my fav sleeping places. :) (gallina didn't make the list, I saw. I loved that place.)

yeah, that heat wave was interesting. I rarely had so early arrivals to day destinations on any of my caminos. but we had fun time and have fun stories! (cooling breeze next to an unaccessible swimming pool in cascina toledina :cool:)

caminka
 

AdrianoConnie

New Member
Wow! Thanks heaps. This really helped to iron out some questions. I do have another question. Your backpacks look tops. We normally carry a back pack and a smaller front pack which in effect balances us out the way your packs do. Did you order them online or were you able to go somewhere and get measured? We live on the south coast of NSW.
Thanks in advance, Adriano and Connie
 

David Bezear

New Member
Wow! Thanks heaps. This really helped to iron out some questions. I do have another question. Your backpacks look tops. We normally carry a back pack and a smaller front pack which in effect balances us out the way your packs do. Did you order them online or were you able to go somewhere and get measured? We live on the south coast of NSW.
Thanks in advance, Adriano and Connie
Thanks for the feedback. I have contacted Aarn in New Zealand to try and find the closest stockists of the packs. Will let you know as soon as I know.
 

David Bezear

New Member
Wow! Thanks heaps. This really helped to iron out some questions. I do have another question. Your backpacks look tops. We normally carry a back pack and a smaller front pack which in effect balances us out the way your packs do. Did you order them online or were you able to go somewhere and get measured? We live on the south coast of NSW.
Thanks in advance, Adriano and Connie
Hi guys,
Here is a link to your closest stockists. Hope it helps, they are great packs. https://www.trekandtravel.com.au/collections/aarn
 

Cullo

New Member
Great insight into the VF thank you I'm planning to go from GSB to Rome in June 2021 good to hear of other Aussie's experience

My wife and I are are in our latter 60s and have just finished walking from GSB to Rome. We had previously walked the Camino Frances (2016) and Via Podiensis (2018). In all cases, our preference has been to avoid the peak seasons (but that comes with the risk or colder and wetter weather); to pre-book accommodation and to stay at gites, small hotels and agriturismos. We had no rest days in 2016, but programmed a couple in 2018 and 2019.

We travelled to GSBP from Italy rather than Switzerland flew into Bologna (via Singapore and Frankfurt). After a couple of days R &R in delightful Bologna, we caught the train to Aosta (easy and ran to the minute) and thereafter the bus to GSBP.

Our journey involved a couple of the variant legs allowing us to spend more time in the hills/forests/woodlands and less on roads - in all, we covered 1163 km in 50 days of walking (we also had a rest day in Pavia, Lucca and Sienna). The vast majority of our journey took us through stunning country, but the eight days we spent walking across the Po Valley were pretty ordinary (very hot, very flat and generally much less scenic).

We found the major difference between the CF, the VP and VF are that the latter two are much less well-travelled. Many of our hosts on the CF had made the journey to Santiago themselves and therefore had a keen understanding of what we were doing, as did local villagers. The CF is clearly more economically significant to the villages along the Way and as such there is a greater willingness to cater for a pilgrim's needs e.g. earlier dining options and pilgrim menus (with wine included!).

Notwithstanding that the VP and VF are more solitary experiences than the CF, each of the routes brings their own rewards. Our two major tips would be to take a 2nd pair of boots on the VF and several sets of pole tips and to understand that the mental challenge of walking for approximately 7 weeks, versus 4, is more about being mentally rather than physically ready.

Good luck!
 

ApCalder

New Member
Thanks for the posts all very interesting
I've Walked The Camino Frances , the Portugues Way and earlier this year the via Podiensis
Loved them all but the French Walk the best
Anyway thinking of the via Francigena from GSB to Rome in May next year 2020
Have a couple of questions .
I like to walk outside busy times so possibly start in late May , can anyone tell when is the Pass passable after the winter , and secondly I have been advised to take a bus through areas around the Po as very flat and uninteresting
I am a reasonably confident and fast walker but due to time away would like to keep to about 40 days max
Thoughts welcomed
Regards Ap
 

AdrianoConnie

New Member
Thanks for the posts all very interesting
I've Walked The Camino Frances , the Portugues Way and earlier this year the via Podiensis
Loved them all but the French Walk the best
Anyway thinking of the via Francigena from GSB to Rome in May next year 2020
Have a couple of questions .
I like to walk outside busy times so possibly start in late May , can anyone tell when is the Pass passable after the winter , and secondly I have been advised to take a bus through areas around the Po as very flat and uninteresting
I am a reasonably confident and fast walker but due to time away would like to keep to about 40 days max
Thoughts welcomed
Regards Ap
Hi ApCalder,
From all of our reading the pass seems to be open by the end of June. We anticipate not getting to the pass until mid to late July and think we should be ok.
Good luck,
Connie and Adriano
 
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