Canterbury to Rome 2021

Aileen

New Member
Hi, I am planning to walk from Canterbury to Rome in 2021. I live in Qld, Australia and would like to know if there is any else planning to start around that time so that we can brainstorm together. Cheers Aileen
 

Cullo

New Member
Hi, I am planning to walk from Canterbury to Rome in 2021. I live in Qld, Australia and would like to know if there is any else planning to start around that time so that we can brainstorm together. Cheers Aileen
Hi Aileen, my wife and I walked from Grand St Bernard’s Pass to Rome along with some fellow Australians a few months ago. Happy to provide our thoughts on an any specific issues/questions you might have.
 

Jennyreeve

Member
Hi Aileen. My husband and I are planning our walk in April 2020, so we Cannot help here unfortunately. So exciting isn’t it.
 

vihrea

New Member
[
Hi, I am planning to walk from Canterbury to Rome in 2021. I live in Qld, Australia and would like to know if there is any else planning to start around that time so that we can brainstorm together. Cheers Aileen
I've just solved one hurdle toward leaving for Canterbury to Rome in 2021 - that is, my wife is willing to get rid of me for an extended period. I've yet to do much research but I am ramping up. you know, refreshing my poor French from university days and so forth. I am from New England, US, the wee tiny State of Vermont.

A departure time of April or May of 2021. I did the Camino de Santiago this year and I'm ready for something a little longer. Let's e-chat.

Jack
 

kimro

New Member
Hi, I am planning to walk from Canterbury to Rome in 2021. I live in Qld, Australia and would like to know if there is any else planning to start around that time so that we can brainstorm together. Cheers Aileen
Hi Aileen, my wife and I walked from Grand St Bernard’s Pass to Rome along with some fellow Australians a few months ago. Happy to provide our thoughts on an any specific issues/questions you might have.
Hi Cullo,
I walked the Camino in 2016 alone and am planning on walking the Via Francigena starting in May 2020. I will be alone on this trip too and know that there will be few other walkers. I also get the idea that that it will be greater distances between towns that on the camino in Spain. This means that I will probably take a water bladder this time instead of just topping up my water bottles. Is this required? I'm interested on how safe it is for a lone 64 year old woman and any ideas of cost per day. I would intend staying in pilgrim hostels if possible. Thanks for any thoughts
Kim
 

kstonewalls

New Member
Hi, I am planning to walk from Canterbury to Rome in 2021. I live in Qld, Australia and would like to know if there is any else planning to start around that time so that we can brainstorm together. Cheers Aileen
We (two Australians from Adelaide) are planning to walk the VF from Canterbury to Rome in 2021, starting possibly in July. Our biggest question at this stage is: How long are we allowed to stay in Europe, given the Schengen limit of a total of 90 days in Europe within a 180 day period? Is it possible to stay longer than this and if so what arrangements regarding visas ( eg for Italy) will we need to put in place? We need to resolve this before we can make any other plans. We would appreciate advice and experiences of others residing in non-Schengen countries who have done the full VF in one go.
 

Galloglaigh

Active Member
A bit more complex but although your are Australian, do you have ties to any Schengen country as far back as your grandparents. Citizens of "new" countries often have undiscovered links to the "old" countries.
 

kstonewalls

New Member
Hi thanks Galloglaigh
My husband also has a British passport, but I am the problem as I am a 6th generation Australian! We have read lots of guidebooks and comments, but we have not found anyone who has appreciated this Schengen visa limitation, including the Confraternity of Pilgrims to Rome.
Aileen, have you considered this aspect yet in your planning?
 

JabbaPapa

Member
We (two Australians from Adelaide) are planning to walk the VF from Canterbury to Rome in 2021, starting possibly in July. Our biggest question at this stage is: How long are we allowed to stay in Europe, given the Schengen limit of a total of 90 days in Europe within a 180 day period? Is it possible to stay longer than this and if so what arrangements regarding visas ( eg for Italy) will we need to put in place? We need to resolve this before we can make any other plans. We would appreciate advice and experiences of others residing in non-Schengen countries who have done the full VF in one go.
If you need a longer stay, then maybe you should apply for a full visa, instead of the simpler tourist "schengen visa".

The French Government website is here : https://france-visas.gouv.fr/en_US/web/france-visas/long-stay-visa

But as you can see, it works as a "schengen visa" in the EU outside France, so in Italy you would be restricted to that same 90-day limit within a 180 day period.

hmmmmm ... you know, the French system is probably just too administratively difficult, they really can be stuck up about this stuff (and forget about Switzerland), so I think I'd advise you to just get an Italian one instead, as it appears to be the most easily obtained -- http://vistoperitalia.esteri.it/home/en

When you fill in the questionnaire, state more than 90 days and "religious reasons" (whether you're personally religious or not, a pilgrimage is a religious reason) -- and the website will provide the addresses where you can make your application (Adelaide (Embassy), Brisbane, Canberra (Embassy), Melbourne, Perth, Sydney)

Your passports and the visa will let you travel through France and Switzerland for 90 days, which should I hope be sufficient, then your Italian visa will cover the rest.
 

kstonewalls

New Member
Thank you. We will give both a try and report our experiences here. Has anyone actually had any success with either French or Italian extended visa applications?
 

JabbaPapa

Member
The current EU visa laws are probably in direct violation of International Law, from their entirely artificial and perhaps legally scandalous imposition of restrictions to ordinary Passport rights and duties enshrined in such things as the Vienna Convention ; but that will not help you in the slightest -- however, having lived over here as an expat since the 1970s, few border agents are as zealous as some of the typical US or Oz ones. The legal principle remains that if you can show your return ticket, and if necessary satisfy them that your cash is good, you should be OK ; particularly in Italy, where they may never even ask you in the first place.
 

Aileen

New Member
Hi Aileen, my wife and I walked from Grand St Bernard’s Pass to Rome along with some fellow Australians a few months ago. Happy to provide our thoughts on an any specific issues/questions you might have.
Hi Cullo, Thanks for responding and your offer to share your experience. What type of accommodation did you stay in and what was the average cost per day. Also, what time of year did you walk and how long did it take you. Thanks heaps. Aileen
 

Aileen

New Member
Hi thanks Galloglaigh
My husband also has a British passport, but I am the problem as I am a 6th generation Australian! We have read lots of guidebooks and comments, but we have not found anyone who has appreciated this Schengen visa limitation, including the Confraternity of Pilgrims to Rome.
Aileen, have you considered this aspect yet in your planning?
Hi,
No I wasn’t aware of this information so am very pleased to be informed. I will have to do some research into how to meet this requirement. Will let you know if I discover anything
 

Aileen

New Member
Hi Aileen. My husband and I are planning our walk in April 2020, so we Cannot help here unfortunately. So exciting isn’t it.
Yes, I cannot believe I am actually seriously considering this. I love walking but have never done nothing like this.
 

Aileen

New Member
Hi thanks Galloglaigh
My husband also has a British passport, but I am the problem as I am a 6th generation Australian! We have read lots of guidebooks and comments, but we have not found anyone who has appreciated this Schengen visa limitation, including the Confraternity of Pilgrims to Rome.
Aileen, have you considered this aspect yet in your planning?
Hi thanks Galloglaigh
My husband also has a British passport, but I am the problem as I am a 6th generation Australian! We have read lots of guidebooks and comments, but we have not found anyone who has appreciated this Schengen visa limitation, including the Confraternity of Pilgrims to Rome.
Aileen, have you considered this aspect yet in your planning?
Hi,
Having now done some research into this, I believe the easiest solution will be to approach the Italian embassy in Australia and apply for a visa extension.
 

Aileen

New Member
[


I've just solved one hurdle toward leaving for Canterbury to Rome in 2021 - that is, my wife is willing to get rid of me for an extended period. I've yet to do much research but I am ramping up. you know, refreshing my poor French from university days and so forth. I am from New England, US, the wee tiny State of Vermont.

A departure time of April or May of 2021. I did the Camino de Santiago this year and I'm ready for something a little longer. Let's e-chat.

Jack
Hi Jack, that is around the time I am looking at doing the walk. How long do you intend to take and what type of accommodation are you considering
Aileen
 

David from Freo

New Member
The legal principle remains that if you can show your return ticket, and if necessary satisfy them that your cash is good, you should be OK ; particularly in Italy, where they may never even ask you in the first place.
Dear JabbaPappa,
Thanks for that advice. In 2018 my wife and I (both Australian passport holders) did a 1400 kms walk from Le Puy en Velay in France to Santiago de Compostella. We had wanted to take longer than the 90 day Schengen visa permitted, and looked into getting longer/resident visas in Netherlands, Spain or France, writing to all these embassies in Australia etc. Eventually we gave up the idea and cut our walk to 90 days only because of the enormous admin required to apply for longer visas. We did not try Italy, but might now for a Via Francigena walk we plan later this year.
Unfortunately, due to the flights we selected in 2018 we were to enter and exit the Schengen Zone via Germany. Their immigration gave us quite some anxiety when we were exiting as it was on day 91 (not 90). They quizzed us about what we had done, where we'd been etc, & made it clear they were not happy, before they eventually stamped our exit permits. We were left with the impression we shouldn't miss the 90 deadline again, just in case we were prevented from coming back to Europe for another future walk.
Best wishes,
David.
 

JabbaPapa

Member
Thanks for that advice. In 2018 my wife and I (both Australian passport holders) did a 1400 kms walk from Le Puy en Velay in France to Santiago de Compostella. We had wanted to take longer than the 90 day Schengen visa permitted, and looked into getting longer/resident visas in Netherlands, Spain or France, writing to all these embassies in Australia etc. Eventually we gave up the idea and cut our walk to 90 days only because of the enormous admin required to apply for longer visas. We did not try Italy, but might now for a Via Francigena walk we plan later this year.
Unfortunately, due to the flights we selected in 2018 we were to enter and exit the Schengen Zone via Germany. Their immigration gave us quite some anxiety when we were exiting as it was on day 91 (not 90). They quizzed us about what we had done, where we'd been etc, & made it clear they were not happy, before they eventually stamped our exit permits. We were left with the impression we shouldn't miss the 90 deadline again, just in case we were prevented from coming back to Europe for another future walk.
This 90 days thing really is annoying, and I'm supposedly going to be subjected to it myself from 2021 onwards (outside France), even as a legal resident of a Member State of the EU (though during the 2020 Brexit transitional period the rules stay the same for us Brits). (but we'll probably benefit from a good deal of tolerance from the residency card)

But then things are always intrinsically easier for someone who lives right on top of the Via Aurelia route of both the Camino and the coastal Francigena variant to Rome, as I need not worry about airports stuff, but just walk, bus, train, even hitch-hike if needed back home.

But AFAIK these tougher immigration and travel policies were I think imposed by the UK, so that after the UK leaves, things may possibly improve (except that there's also the internal complexities of Ireland to consider in all of this). (I'll refrain from getting more political than that)

If I can suggest something, perhaps you might consider travelling back from Rome to northern France by train, then crossing over to the UK by ferry, passports and airway tickets out of the UK in hand for the UK passports control ? And if you're worried about exiting from the illegal immigrant heavy Calais and Boulogne (no idea what those routes are like nowadays, gone is the 20th Century when it was still possible to just hitch a ride across the sea, as I've done a few times), maybe consider the longer Dieppe to Newhaven route ? Yes, that would be "cheating", but not really as you simply will not be living in any of these countries, but you live in Australia.

And yeah, Germany is probably best avoided ...
 
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