Canterbury to Rome 2021

Jennyreeve

Member
Hi Cullo,
I walked the Camino in 2016 alone and am planning on walking the Via Francigena starting in May 2020. I will be alone on this trip too and know that there will be few other walkers. I also get the idea that that it will be greater distances between towns that on the camino in Spain. This means that I will probably take a water bladder this time instead of just topping up my water bottles. Is this required? I'm interested on how safe it is for a lone 64 year old woman and any ideas of cost per day. I would intend staying in pilgrim hostels if possible. Thanks for any thoughts
Kim
I have read that churches have taps for watering the flowers. Mostly they are potable, so can top up there.
 

JabbaPapa

Member
I have read that churches have taps for watering the flowers. Mostly they are potable, so can top up there.
erm, actually very often they're not -- but they can be a good emergency solution in a situation in need.

Don't make a habit of drinking that water !!
 

Aileen

New Member
Are you planning to walk Canterbury to Rome or only a section?
Hi, I was planning to walk the whole way but I think this visa issue will make that difficult. I am now looking a doing the journey over 2 years with the first section Canterbury to Lausanne next year and then the second section a year or two after that.
 

Cullo

New Member
Hi Cullo, Thanks for responding and your offer to share your experience. What type of accommodation did you stay in and what was the average cost per day. Also, what time of year did you walk and how long did it take you. Thanks heaps. Aileen
Hello Aileen, we started walking on Aug 25 at Great Saint Bernard's Pass and arrived in Rome on 16 Oct having had a rest day in Pavia, Lucca and Siena. We have very few wet days but plenty of hot ones (especially across the Po Valley). We stayed in small hotels, a couple of B&Bs and 3 agriturismos - the accommodation ranged from simple but entirely adequate to gorgeous with two exceptions (which were dumps). I can't give you a simple answer regarding the cost because an agent pre-booked all of the accommodation for us in advance and we payed a 'lump' sum. I can advise that there's some great advice to be found regarding accommodation and costs associated with hostel-type accommodation in Anita Raftery's VF blog (just google her).

We loved the walk and hope you do too!
 

Avromal

New Member
A bit more complex but although your are Australian, do you have ties to any Schengen country as far back as your grandparents. Citizens of "new" countries often have undiscovered links to the "old" countries.
Hi Galloglaigh, could you expand a bit more on Grandparents from any Schengen country? I do, but was under the impression that it had to be a parent.

Thanks,

Mal.
 

Aileen

New Member
Hello Aileen, we started walking on Aug 25 at Great Saint Bernard's Pass and arrived in Rome on 16 Oct having had a rest day in Pavia, Lucca and Siena. We have very few wet days but plenty of hot ones (especially across the Po Valley). We stayed in small hotels, a couple of B&Bs and 3 agriturismos - the accommodation ranged from simple but entirely adequate to gorgeous with two exceptions (which were dumps). I can't give you a simple answer regarding the cost because an agent pre-booked all of the accommodation for us in advance and we payed a 'lump' sum. I can advise that there's some great advice to be found regarding accommodation and costs associated with hostel-type accommodation in Anita Raftery's VF blog (just google her).

We loved the walk and hope you do too!
Thanks for this information. I will look at Anita's post.
 

Galloglaigh

Active Member
Hi Galloglaigh, could you expand a bit more on Grandparents from any Schengen country? I do, but was under the impression that it had to be a parent.
It depends on the country and sometimes the sex of the grandparent or even parent. Ireland it is grandparents. Italy is different in that children of Italian mothers by birth can apply only if born from 1st January 1948. Citizenship is decided by the country's rules but once a citizen you can travel within the EU.

As I mentioned, there are lots of people whose European parents/grandparents were dispersed last century whose birthrights may still count.
 
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