General information on walking in Italy?

Betseylou

New Member
I haven't been able to find a thread with this information, or maybe I just haven't figure out how to search it properly.

What can I expect about how a day in Italy works?

What time can you arrive/leave at a refugio?

Is there a specific time you can get lunch in a restaurant? For example, only open from noon - two?

Are there any days where restaurants are closed, and you have to plan ahead for lunches or other meals?

Are shops closed for a siesta in the afternoon and grocery stores aren't open?

What time can you expect to eat dinner?

Any other questions like this that I haven't listed?

Thank you!
 

JabbaPapa

New Member
Is there a specific time you can get lunch in a restaurant? For example, only open from noon - two?
Between 12 and 3 fairly often, though that varies from one restaurant to another.

Are there any days where restaurants are closed, and you have to plan ahead for lunches or other meals?
Varies from one restaurant to another, but there's not a day when most will be closed -- although some of them cater mainly to people working, so they can close on weekends.

Are shops closed for a siesta in the afternoon and grocery stores aren't open?
Not really for siesta no, but many of them are closed in the early afternoon as a late lunch break ...

What time can you expect to eat dinner?
I'd aim for about 8-ish -- though pizzerie have very different hours.
 
Have a read of some of the blogs. The one below is quite detailed on the variations there are by town and by day. For example, in large towns/cities like Siena you'll find something open but a few miles down the road, it will be difficult to find anything open.

http://kentontheviafrancigena.com/2015/07/09/into-the-wild-on-the-via-francigena/

You are best to work out your stages and check for specifics for different stages. I found accommodation rather than restaurants to be the limiting factor.
 

frida1

New Member
You should have the Via Francigena and Sloways app on your phone. They provide info in the routes and some for accommodation. Tourist offices can be helpful. We stayed mainly in bnbs, apartments or hotels I found on booking or in the apps. For those using pilgrim accommodation you need to call ahead, because they are often church oriented and staff needs to be on hand. When we used the hostel system, they called ahead to the next one for us.

For whatever reason, Italians don’t seem to respond to email, you need to phone.

WiFi is surprisingly lacking in some parts of Italy.

We had many walking days where there was no where to stop between destinations for food or drink, but we’re used to carrying food and water. Water fountains are pretty available. Dinner usually can’t be found before 7:30 or 8:00. However, food is delicious and about 6:00 bars begin to serve aperitivo, inexpensive snacks with drinks that can be good and filling.

We had no problem finding well stocked groceries and wonderful cafes in towns for breakfast. Breakfast in Italy is pastries and coffee. Period. Occasionally you'll get yogurt or fruit, but not often.

Italy is really beautiful and our walk took a few surprising twists to give time to enjoy the spectacular art and architecture in that we needed a few more short and rest days to do that. Have a wonderful camino!
 
Last edited:

Jennyreeve

New Member
I haven't been able to find a thread with this information, or maybe I just haven't figure out how to search it properly.

What can I expect about how a day in Italy works?

What time can you arrive/leave at a refugio?

Is there a specific time you can get lunch in a restaurant? For example, only open from noon - two?

Are there any days where restaurants are closed, and you have to plan ahead for lunches or other meals?

Are shops closed for a siesta in the afternoon and grocery stores aren't open?

What time can you expect to eat dinner?
Have a read of some of the blogs. The one below is quite detailed on the variations there are by town and by day. For example, in large towns/cities like Siena you'll find something open but a few miles down the road, it will be difficult to find anything open.

http://kentontheviafrancigena.com/2015/07/09/into-the-wild-on-the-via-francigena/

You are best to work out your stages and check for specifics for different stages. I found accommodation rather than restaurants to be the limiting factor.
This blog is very good.lots of tips and detailed information
Any other questions like this that I haven't listed?

Thank you!
 

Betseylou

New Member
You should have the Via Francigena and Sloways app on your phone. They provide info in the routes and some for accommodation. Tourist offices can be helpful. We stayed mainly in bnbs, apartments or hotels I found on booking or in the apps. For those using pilgrim accommodation you need to call ahead, because they are often church oriented and staff needs to be on hand. When we used the hostel system, they called ahead to the next one for us.

For whatever reason, Italians don’t seem to respond to email, you need to phone.

WiFi is surprisingly lacking in some parts of Italy.

We had many walking days where there was no where to stop between destinations for food or drink, but we’re used to carrying food and water. Water fountains are pretty available. Dinner usually can’t be found before 7:30 or 8:00. However, food is delicious and about 6:00 bars begin to serve aperitivo, inexpensive snacks with drinks that can be good and filling.

We had no problem finding well stocked groceries and wonderful cafes in towns for breakfast. Breakfast in Italy is pastries and coffee. Period. Occasionally you'll get yogurt or fruit, but not often.

Italy is really beautiful and our walk took a few surprising twists to give time to enjoy the spectacular art and architecture in that we needed a few more short and rest days to do that. Have a wonderful camino!
Thank you so much! This is very helpful. It's probably a good idea to carry non perishable lunch items just in case.
 

frida1

New Member
We usually have some kind of bread, cheese and fruit. Sometimes a sweet and sometimes even last night’s leftovers.
 
I haven't been able to find a thread with this information, or maybe I just haven't figure out how to search it properly.

What can I expect about how a day in Italy works?

What time can you arrive/leave at a refugio?

Is there a specific time you can get lunch in a restaurant? For example, only open from noon - two?

Are there any days where restaurants are closed, and you have to plan ahead for lunches or other meals?

Are shops closed for a siesta in the afternoon and grocery stores aren't open?

What time can you expect to eat dinner?

Any other questions like this that I haven't listed?

Thank you!
Most towns and villages are about 8 or 10 miles apart.. They have cafe’s and most have outdoor markets, fresh fruits and cheeses.
There are monasteries well placed and near markets where you can get dinner goodies and small cafes for morning coffee.
You can decide on stops with your online francigena
Maps
 

Marietjie

New Member
I plan to walk in Tuscany in May 2020 from Luca to Siena. I have a few questions though: Is it save to walk alone? What kind of accommodation can I expect? What about hostels as on the Camino in Spain? What is more or less the distance between the towns? Is there a printable list of the accommodation on the internet or on this forum?
 

caminka

Member
a thing to consider is the middle of the day closing time of just about everything. this is usually 12h, sometimes later. the businesses then open from 15h or 16h.
 

Marietjie

New Member
Is it save to walk on your own in Italy? Can you budget for an average of 30 Euros per day, for hostels and something to eat?
 

caminka

Member
Is it save to walk on your own in Italy? Can you budget for an average of 30 Euros per day, for hostels and something to eat?
I felt perfectly safe the whole time.
my statistics inform me that I mostly managed to sleep for about €10-15 a night and bought food and cooked for about €10 a day. notable exceptions were siena (€20 for a very nice ostello in the centre next to the cathedral), aosta valley where there is a shortage of cheap accommodation (I averaged about €25 per night) and rome (€25 with breakfast in a very nice ostello monte mario before the final 6km, €27 in ostello marello, but you can stay for two nights in the pilgrim ostello in trastevere for donativo).
look at the accommodation list in the resources.
 
Last edited:
Top