Hi from Brisbane

Kay

New Member
Hi My husband and I walked the Camino Frances in 2013 and the Camino del Norte in 2015.
We're looking forward to the Via Francigena which we plan to start in September 2017 from Bourg-Saint- Pierre Switzerland. I'm doing lots of research but maybe too much as I'm getting conflicting info. Does this trip really need more planning than the Camino?
 

William Marques

Moderator
Staff member
Perhaps though from where you are starting only a little more. The refugio system on the caminos is pretty organised and although there is enough accommodation on the VF it is not all the same standard and ringing ahead is sometimes necessary.

In your signature are two large (on my screen) commercial links. Please could you edit them to display less obviously.
 

Kay

New Member
Thank you for your reply.
I am not sure what this.....
"your signature are two large (on myscreen) commercial links. Please could you edit them to display less obviously"....refers to.
I'll happily oblige when I understand what the problem is.
 

Charl Durand

New Member
Hello Kay, we're starting from Lausanne, also in September, around the 3rd. We've walked the Frances and Aragones routes in 2015, I find it means we now know what to look out for, and what not to stress about. So far I think it's about the same amount of planning, perhaps with more left to chance because there are less reviews of accommodation from pilgrims to guide one's planning. What kinds of conflicting information are you referring to?
 

Kay

New Member
Hello Kay, we're starting from Lausanne, also in September, around the 3rd. We've walked the Frances and Aragones routes in 2015, I find it means we now know what to look out for, and what not to stress about. So far I think it's about the same amount of planning, perhaps with more left to chance because there are less reviews of accommodation from pilgrims to guide one's planning. What kinds of conflicting information are you referring to?
Hi Charl,
I have real that the signs are really good. I've read it's poorly signed. The accommodation is sparse....it's plentiful. It's easy to get your testimonium......know one knows what you're talking about when you get to St Peters about it. That sort of thing.
Perhaps it just depends on who is writing the story and perhaps the time of year they're there.
Either way we'll enjoy the journey. I can't wait.
 

Domigee

Member
Hi Charl,
I have real that the signs are really good. I've read it's poorly signed. The accommodation is sparse....it's plentiful. It's easy to get your testimonium......know one knows what you're talking about when you get to St Peters about it. .
I think (or rather I hope) it depends on which part of the VF you are walking.... The French part, for ex., was (in my view) very poorly marked and indeed the accommodation was at times sparse. I was prepared for the long(ish) distances between nightly stops but not for the lack of food available. Quite a few places that were mentioned in my guidebook had closed down by the time I walked it.
From what I have read it seems the Italian part is very different.
We shall see :). Looking forward to it, whatever...
 
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Bradypus

Active Member
Having walked several of the Spanish Caminos I would say that the Italian section of the VF does take a little more planning and forethought - though not necessarily long in advance. Pilgrim accommodation is less common and often quite small. Most towns have only one pilgrim ostello - not the multitude found along the Camino Frances. That can mean longer stages than you might walk on the Camino Frances. It also means that you may have to phone the previous day to reserve a bed. Some providers ask specifically that you do this. You should be prepared to spend the occasional night in private accommodation rather than ostellos when necessary. Similarly there can be longer stages between bars, restaurants and food shops so it is more important to carry a small food reserve and take advantage of opportunities to resupply as you find them.
 
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