Place "worthy" of an extra stay.

Zwonkie

New Member
Hi,

I am planning the finer details of my trip from Siena to Rome and I was considering to stay an extra day/night somewhere along the route.
Can anyone recommend a city/place which "deserves" an extra stay?
E.g. somewhere really special, with lots of old structures, great view or perhaps interesting activities.

Thanks in advance...
 

Piero Frustascarpe

Moderator
Staff member
Everywhere, in Italy, there are old structures. :)
In addition to the suggestions of William...
Siena deserves at least a couple of days, just to visit the churches, not to mention the museums.
A detour to Montalcino to enjoy good food and among the best wines in Italy.
San Quirico d'Orcia, a small beautiful jewel.
Bagno Vignoni to enjoy the thermal water...
Bolsena, nice village, also good to swim and/or paddle in the lake.
 

sharon w

New Member
Everywhere, in Italy, there are old structures. :)
In addition to the suggestions of William...
Siena deserves at least a couple of days, just to visit the churches, not to mention the museums.
A detour to Montalcino to enjoy good food and among the best wines in Italy.
San Quirico d'Orcia, a small beautiful jewel.
Bagno Vignoni to enjoy the thermal water...
Bolsena, nice village, also good to swim and/or paddle in the lake.
Porto is the detour to Montalcino along a road or track?
 

JabbaPapa

New Member
Montefiascone or Bolsena, or alternatively anywhere in Tuscany that's up on top of the mountains with those stunningly beautiful views ...

It's true that Montalcino is rather wonderful as well ... or you could take a great big detour, and stop in Florence, Siena, or Perugia. Perugia is the easiest of the three to have a nice time in that would remain simple and pilgrim-like. Florence is a bit too city-like, and Siena a little too touristy (though it's also the most beautiful). And apart from the steaks, which Florence has the best of in the whole of Italy, the food's better in Perugia.

Outside Tuscany, I'd say that the northernmost parts of Latium are an option too, mainly because the people there are incredibly nice. And normal prices too, rather than the inflated touristy ones that are 90% unavoidable in Tuscany.
 

andycohn

New Member
If you’re interested in walking to Montalcino from Buonconvento, I know of an alternative route that will take you from Buonconvento to Montalcino, and then onwards to re-connect with the Francigena at Bagno Vignoni. Montalcino is well worth the stop. Among other things, you pass by an ancient abby, where you can hear the monks’ Gregorian chanting. The over-all walk is gorgeous. It is described in a book called Walking and Eating in Umbria and Tuscany by James and Pia Lasdun. If you’re interested. in doing this walk, I could scan the relevant part and email it to you. (It’s also described in Piero’s link, above, but I’m guessing you don’t read. Italian). Perugia is also a fine city to visit, not heavily touristed at all, but it’s much bigger and you certainly can’t walk to it.
 

Zwonkie

New Member
Thanks for all the great suggestions - some which I would never have thought/known about..
I think Montefiascone or Vitterbo would suit me the best. They are on-route and seem to fit well ½way to rome from Siena, so a resting day would be appricated then (I would guess).

I am sure I will try out some of the suggestions next time i'm in italy for a holiday or trekking trip.

Btw, I cant seem to find any info. But I once stayed near Montevarchi and there, a trekking/hiking trip was mentioned, something like the "seven bridge" on/near the moutain ridge. From near florence to near arezzo i think.
Anyone got some links/info?
 

sharon w

New Member
If you’re interested in walking to Montalcino from Buonconvento, I know of an alternative route that will take you from Buonconvento to Montalcino, and then onwards to re-connect with the Francigena at Bagno Vignoni. Montalcino is well worth the stop. Among other things, you pass by an ancient abby, where you can hear the monks’ Gregorian chanting. The over-all walk is gorgeous. It is described in a book called Walking and Eating in Umbria and Tuscany by James and Pia Lasdun. If you’re interested. in doing this walk, I could scan the relevant part and email it to you. (It’s also described in Piero’s link, above, but I’m guessing you don’t read. Italian). Perugia is also a fine city to visit, not heavily touristed at all, but it’s much bigger and you certainly can’t walk to it.
I would love to walk this way. Will pm you.
 
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