Tent query

Jennyreeve

New Member
My husband and I are starting our Via Francigena walk on 20th April 2020. Starting from our home in Ringmer. We are undecided on wether to take a tent as it would mean buying one especially. Is it recommended to take one, or is there usually enough accommodation (pilgrim or B&B)? All suggestions appreciated.
 

Roving rufus

New Member
A tent is not essential but can prove useful. It does provide another source of accommodation options at campsites which may mean it is easier and cheaper to find accommodation than solely relying on pilgrim accommodation , gites d'etape, chambre d'hotes and hotels. In a pinch I also found that someone might let me camp in their garden. In France I only wild camped once as it was vendage in Champagne region. (Others wild camped much more consistently.) However I already had camping gear so it was not a major outlay. I would say most walking do not carry a tent and manage to find somewhere to stay though it may take creative and planning. I did meet 2 young french people who were walking for a week from Langres who managed to persuade locals to let them stay in there houses but that would take speaking french well and luck!
 
Parts of rural France can be an issue but you can always find accomodation by upscaling or downscaling or taking a bus/taxi to it. There is a large list on the official VF site here and you can plan / see where there may be gaps in accomodation.

https://www.viefrancigene.org/en/resource/blog/Webmaster/accoglienza-pellegrina-e-turistica/

Plenty of people (like@RovingRufus) have done it to various degrees of success. You can see some examples on YouTube like this one


Their journey is in 6 parts. In part 6 at 3:50 he gives the statistics that they were able to camp for 80 nights. Hostels were 8 and hotels were 1. Cost per person using a tent was just over €2000 for a couple.

Suppose you could answer the question yourself by deciding if
a) you like staying in tents and
b) are you up to carrying the extra weight?

My main tip to anyone trying it, is to have your route planned in detail before you go. Know exactly where you want to be by when. Add in your "escape" routes too as you might need to vary your plan as you go along. Knowing the nearest train station takes away the worry of being stranded when something goes wrong.
 

Jennyreeve

New Member
A tent is not essential but can prove useful. It does provide another source of accommodation options at campsites which may mean it is easier and cheaper to find accommodation than solely relying on pilgrim accommodation , gites d'etape, chambre d'hotes and hotels. In a pinch I also found that someone might let me camp in their garden. In France I only wild camped once as it was vendage in Champagne region. (Others wild camped much more consistently.) However I already had camping gear so it was not a major outlay. I would say most walking do not carry a tent and manage to find somewhere to stay though it may take creative and planning. I did meet 2 young french people who were walking for a week from Langres who managed to persuade locals to let them stay in there houses but that would take speaking french well and luck!
Thank you for your helpful information. It is a difficult decision. We would only use a tent as back up if we are absolutely stuck for accommodation. I have a feeling we will probably go without and plan ahead. Still a few months to make a final decision.
 

Jennyreeve

New Member
A tent is not essential but can prove useful. It does provide another source of accommodation options at campsites which may mean it is easier and cheaper to find accommodation than solely relying on pilgrim accommodation , gites d'etape, chambre d'hotes and hotels. In a pinch I also found that someone might let me camp in their garden. In France I only wild camped once as it was vendage in Champagne region. (Others wild camped much more consistently.) However I already had camping gear so it was not a major outlay. I would say most walking do not carry a tent and manage to find somewhere to stay though it may take creative and planning. I did meet 2 young french people who were walking for a week from Langres who managed to persuade locals to let them stay in there houses but that would take speaking french well and luck!
Many thanks, that is good information. I think we will plan a couple of days in advance as we travel. Probably do without a tent.....a few months left until we make a commitment. We are really looking forward to the exciting challenge of the trip.
 
I walked from Lausanne to Rome, wo a tent. There are several options but, do use the via Francigena on-line daily map. Monasteries are a good bet when you get into Italy and small hotels etc(on map) are a good backup.
Lodging on the route can be inexpensive.
When you aren’t at at monastery
It can be a nice change.
gretelschuck@yahoo.com

My husband and I are starting our Via Francigena walk on 20th April 2020. Starting from our home in Ringmer. We are undecided on wether to take a tent as it would mean buying one especially. Is it recommended to take one, or is there usually enough accommodation (pilgrim or B&B)? All suggestions appreciated.
 

Jennyreeve

New Member
I walked from Lausanne to Rome, wo a tent. There are several options but, do use the via Francigena on-line daily map. Monasteries are a good bet when you get into Italy and small hotels etc(on map) are a good backup.
Lodging on the route can be inexpensive.
When you aren’t at at monastery
It can be a nice change.
gretelschuck@yahoo.com
Thank you for your helpful information. I think we will go without a tent. Really excited.
 

AdrianoConnie

New Member
We leave for our VF next June and we are taking a tent. We know that there is accommodation along the way but just in case we will be prepared. Our tent weighs 2.3kg. We are balancing ourselves out. Getting very excited
 
In Italy, Maybe with the two of you, the tent maybe easier?The monasteries are are pretty well distributed and have kitchens, showers beds etc. and cost about 15euros/pp/night
I “dumped” my tent after a few days. Didn’t want to struggle with it after a days walk, and campgrounds cost more than Monasteries. They are well marked on the (via f) app
Good luck
Enjoy
 

Jennyreeve

New Member
We leave for our VF next June and we are taking a tent. We know that there is accommodation along the way but just in case we will be prepared. Our tent weighs 2.3kg. We are balancing ourselves out. Getting very excited
It is exciting isn’t it! We cannot wait to get started.
 

Jennyreeve

New Member
In Italy, Maybe with the two of you, the tent maybe easier?The monasteries are are pretty well distributed and have kitchens, showers beds etc. and cost about 15euros/pp/night
I “dumped” my tent after a few days. Didn’t want to struggle with it after a days walk, and campgrounds cost more than Monasteries. They are well marked on the (via f) app
Good luck
Enjoy
Thank you. I think we will probably not take one.
 
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