Where to start?

meye1099

New Member
Hi, everyone! I've been aware of the Via Francigena for a couple years now but have only recently starting thinking about it seriously. I was wondering if anyone could point me to some good resources to begin planning a walk on the Via Francigena in the Italy portion? The guidebooks listed on Amazon look a few years old and I'm guessing are a little outdated.

Also, what are some popular starting points to walk the VF in Italy?

Thanks!
 

William Marques

Moderator
Staff member
The Lightfoot guides are as far as I know still the best ones in English. There are many online resources perhaps this is the best.

Starting points to me would be St Bernard Pass (All Italy), Aosta (from the base of the pass), Ivrea (start of the Po flatlands), Fidenza after the flatland before the Cisa Pass), Lucca (Tuscany avoiding the coastal section), Sienna (about the minimum for a good long walk) depending on how far you want to walk. The minimum for the testimonium is from Montefiascone.
 

meye1099

New Member
The Lightfoot guides are as far as I know still the best ones in English. There are many online resources perhaps this is the best.

Starting points to me would be St Bernard Pass (All Italy), Aosta (from the base of the pass), Ivrea (start of the Po flatlands), Fidenza after the flatland before the Cisa Pass), Lucca (Tuscany avoiding the coastal section), Sienna (about the minimum for a good long walk) depending on how far you want to walk. The minimum for the testimonium is from Montefiascone.
Thank you!
 

andycohn

New Member
I find the official guidebook, only recently published in English, to be the best. "The Via Francigena, 1000 Km. On Foot from Gran San Bernardo to Rome, by R. Ferrari, Luciano Callegari, et al, pub. Terre di Mezzo." You can order it from the official website. www.viefrancigene.org. I recently put together a resource sheet on the VF for our local Camino group in the SF Bay Area. You might find it useful. It's attached. Buon Cammino!
 

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Adrian

New Member
I find the official guidebook, only recently published in English, to be the best. "The Via Francigena, 1000 Km. On Foot from Gran San Bernardo to Rome, by R. Ferrari, Luciano Callegari, et al, pub. Terre di Mezzo." You can order it from the official website. www.viefrancigene.org. I recently put together a resource sheet on the VF for our local Camino group in the SF Bay Area. You might find it useful. It's attached. Buon Cammino!
This book can be found on the amazon.uk website cheaper than official site.
 
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