Which route: Via Francigena -or- Way of St Francis?

#1
My wife & I walked the Camino Frances (St Jean - Santiago, then to Finesterre) in '16. Looking at the Via Francigena (unsure of starting point at this time) to Rome but we are also looking at the Way of St Francis with a starting point in Florence, through Assisi, to Rome.

Which is the more common route, the Via Francigena or the Way of St Francis? Is the Way of St Francis any more religiously significant, other than the portions which are documented to include the path of St Francis?

What are the annual pilgrim counts on each route? I gather that they are both relatively uncrowded, like the beginning stages of the Camino (versus the last 200km leading into Sarria and then to Santiago). But I'm curious if there are any annual pilgrim counts for either route?

According to what I can find about the Way of St Francis route it has some areas very poorly marked, others marked pretty well with GPS (or GPS tracks in an iPhone) highly recommended. How about the markings of the Via Francigena?

Basically trying to decide which route and looking for some comparisons about each route.
 

William Marques

Moderator
Staff member
#2
As far as I know there are no pilgrim statistics kept for walking pilgrims to Rome listed in the same way as Santiago does it. The Via Francigena will be more populated than the St Francis way based on the number of credentials issued AFAIK.

The Via Francigena is much more religiously significant that the St Francis route unless you have a particular interest in St Francis.

In Italy the markings on the Via Francigena are now pretty good.

Neither route will be a race for accommodation though there is less accommodation and the distance between places to stay is longer than the CF.
 
#3
Dear Melensdad
I have had similar debates. Having walked the Francés (from SJPdP 2015), Português (from Lisbon 2016) and VdlP (from Seville 2017), I wanted a pilgrimage for 2018. As I live just north of one famous St.Peters (York Minster), I decided on my starting point easily - Home. So I shall follow my route from Home to Rome via YORK and St Paul’s via Canterbury. Having looked at the route options, I have chosen the Segeric route. The crossover to get to Assisi was not appealing.
I have thoroughly researched my route through France, Switzerland and Italy. I have consolidated my GPS route using the Lightfoot books. I am more than happy to share with you. Brian Mooney’s book ‘A Long Way for a Pizza’ is a very useful, humerous account of his ‘Home to Rome’.
Very best regards,
Stuart
 
#4
We are not sure which route to take. Way of St Francis (Florence > Assisi > Rome) or the more traditional Via Francigena route.

Anyone have any suggestions/opinions on why one rougte might be better than the other?

We walked the Camino de Santiago in 2016, looking for another route, planning for about a 30 day walk.
 
#5
Dear Melensdad
I have had similar debates. Having walked the Francés (from SJPdP 2015), Português (from Lisbon 2016) and VdlP (from Seville 2017), I wanted a pilgrimage for 2018. As I live just north of one famous St.Peters (York Minster), I decided on my starting point easily - Home. So I shall follow my route from Home to Rome via YORK and St Paul’s via Canterbury. Having looked at the route options, I have chosen the Segeric route. The crossover to get to Assisi was not appealing.
I have thoroughly researched my route through France, Switzerland and Italy. I have consolidated my GPS route using the Lightfoot books. I am more than happy to share with you. Brian Mooney’s book ‘A Long Way for a Pizza’ is a very useful, humerous account of his ‘Home to Rome’.
Very best regards,
Stuart
Stuart, I am walking from Pontremoli to Rome and if you would like to share your route with me I would be most grateful. I had the Brierley guide for the Camino but to get the guide for the Francigena posted here was 37 Euros! so a bit ridiculous. Thanks very much.
 
Top