Which stages would you do if you had 20 days.

Vigo

New Member
My wife and I are planning Aosta to Rome walk in September, and we only have about 3 weeks. My question for those who have walked the VF, which stages would you walk and which you would hop.
I have walked most of the Caminos in Spain, one of those with my wife, so we are comfortable with 20+ kms per day. We would appreciate any input.
 

Piero Frustascarpe

Moderator
Staff member
You can put together the legs that don't have too much height. E.g. After Ivrea until Fiorenzuola is all flat. From Sarzana to San Quirico the height is not so hard. After Acquapendente again not too much steepness...
 
Tusc
My wife and I are planning Aosta to Rome walk in September, and we only have about 3 weeks. My question for those who have walked the VF, which stages would you walk and which you would hop.
I have walked most of the Caminos in Spain, one of those with my wife, so we are comfortable with 20+ kms per day. We would appreciate any input.
My wife and I are planning Aosta to Rome walk in September, and we only have about 3 weeks. My question for those who have walked the VF, which stages would you walk and which you would hop.
I have walked most of the Caminos in Spain, one of those with my wife, so we are comfortable with 20+ kms per day. We would appreciate any input.
Switzerland and Tuscany!!
 

Vigo

New Member
Yes Tuscany is a big part of it. Switzerland, only for a few hundred meters, if I start from Saint Bernard Pass.
 

caminka

Member
I would like to start at the Pass, if it is open late September.
this very much depends on the weather. the official bus runs till the end of august, after that there are only buses through the tunnel.
the pass is open year-round and the hospice on top as well, but the road is only open june - september, the beginnig and the start weather-permitting. you are very strongly advised to call ahead to see what the conditions are up there. in bourg-st-pierre you can also rent snow-shoes.

se this very useful post on camino de santiago forum: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/gsb-a-guide-to-crossing-the-great-st-bernard-pass.59812/.
 

Vigo

New Member
this very much depends on the weather. the official bus runs till the end of august, after that there are only buses through the tunnel.
the pass is open year-round and the hospice on top as well, but the road is only open june - september, the beginnig and the start weather-permitting. you are very strongly advised to call ahead to see what the conditions are up there. in bourg-st-pierre you can also rent snow-shoes.

se this very useful post on camino de santiago forum: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/gsb-a-guide-to-crossing-the-great-st-bernard-pass.59812/.
This helps very much, it was never clear to me if the pass is open year-round. So when the road is closed, one can still take a bus across to the other side? Thanks
 

caminka

Member
This helps very much, it was never clear to me if the pass is open year-round. So when the road is closed, one can still take a bus across to the other side? Thanks
yes, the bus (and all the other traffic) runs through the tunnel under the pass. the tunnel is open year-round. it runs from bourg-saint-bernard on the swiss side (just a toll) to saint-rhémy-en-bosses on the italian side (it actually comes out a bit higher than the village).
 

Vigo

New Member
yes, the bus (and all the other traffic) runs through the tunnel under the pass. the tunnel is open year-round. it runs from bourg-saint-bernard on the swiss side (just a toll) to saint-rhémy-en-bosses on the italian side (it actually comes out a bit higher than the village).
Thanks caminka
 

caminka

Member
Caminka, I just noticed your long list of Caminos/trails. I would like to ask if you could name your top three favorites?
Thanks again
huh, that's a tough one. I would perhaps easier name favorite stretches. in no particular order:

via podiensis
sentier cathare
voie d'ossau
camino francés

they are a very good balance of natural, cultural, historical, social, physical and spiritual. it's probably no coincidence three of them are in france, I love france. it's been awhile since I've seen camino francés (2012) but I have a feeling it's coming around again in the following years. however I look at it, it's been something special.

other stretches I liked:

parts of ligurian coast on via della costa
descent from the alps on via domitia
provence on via aurelia
via tolosana between montarnaud and castres
rolling hills of gascogne (anywhere)
iparla ridge on gr 10
basque country on camino del norte
asturian coast on camino del norte
especially asturia on camino primitivo
the gorges and canyons of gr 99

you will notice the obvious lack of flat regions and the obvious preference for hills and mountains. :)
 

Vigo

New Member
huh, that's a tough one. I would perhaps easier name favorite stretches. in no particular order:

via podiensis
sentier cathare
voie d'ossau
camino francés

they are a very good balance of natural, cultural, historical, social, physical and spiritual. it's probably no coincidence three of them are in france, I love france. it's been awhile since I've seen camino francés (2012) but I have a feeling it's coming around again in the following years. however I look at it, it's been something special.

other stretches I liked:

parts of ligurian coast on via della costa
descent from the alps on via domitia
provence on via aurelia
via tolosana between montarnaud and castres
rolling hills of gascogne (anywhere)
iparla ridge on gr 10
basque country on camino del norte
asturian coast on camino del norte
especially asturia on camino primitivo
the gorges and canyons of gr 99

you will notice the obvious lack of flat regions and the obvious preference for hills and mountains. :)
Oh my, I now have to research all that.
You mentioned CF, I did it in 2015, it was my first and loved it. Then I took a friend to do CF just last month. We had to cut it short because he came down with bronchitis, we flew back to L.A. a couple of weeks ago.
Honestly I didn't mind leaving the CF, it was stressful and not very pleasant. Even though April is not a peak season for CF, it was still a daunting task to make sure you had a place to sleep the next day, every day.
 

caminka

Member
Oh my, I now have to research all that.
hehe. always happy to give ideas. :)

You mentioned CF, I did it in 2015, it was my first and loved it. Then I took a friend to do CF just last month. We had to cut it short because he came down with bronchitis, we flew back to L.A. a couple of weeks ago.
Honestly I didn't mind leaving the CF, it was stressful and not very pleasant. Even though April is not a peak season for CF, it was still a daunting task to make sure you had a place to sleep the next day, every day.
yes, that is certainly something a pilgrim today needs to prepare for. this year there has been a big increase in numbers in march and april, compared to previous years. some of that is probably explained by favourable holidays. I strongly hope and believe that the bed rush is still possible to avoid. several strategies have been discussed on the original forum (starting in the middle of the week, intermediate stages, reservations...). that said, I am not going in 2021.
 
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